All posts tagged: TBR

Press Play: Audible Weekly (18/11- 24/11/2013)

Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy by Helen Fielding From Audible: With her hotly anticipated third instalment, Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy, Fielding introduces us to a whole new enticing phase of Bridget’s life set in contemporary London, including the challenges of maintaining sex appeal as the years roll by and the nightmare of drunken texting, the skinny jean, the disastrous email CC, total lack of twitter followers, and TVs that need 90 buttons and three remotes to simply turn on. An uproariously funny novel of modern life, Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy is a triumphant return of our favourite Everywoman. This seems to be getting mixed reviews but, having loved both of the previous Bridget Jones’ books (& the subsequent movies), I feel like I owe it to her character to read on – if only to see where life takes her next. And, as I’ve said once before: It’s only chic-lit so… how bad can it be? The Perfume Collector by Kathleen Tessaro From Audible: One letter will turn newly married …

Press Play: Audible Weekly (11/11- 17/11/2013)

Expo 58 by Jonathan Coe From Audible: London, 1958: unassuming civil servant Thomas Foley is plucked from his desk at the Central Office of Information and sent on a six-month trip to Brussels. His task: to keep an eye on The Brittania, a brand new pub which will form the heart of the British presence at Expo 58 – the biggest World’s Fair of the century, and the first to be held since the Second World War. As soon as he arrives at the site, Thomas feels that he has escaped a repressed, backward-looking country and fallen headlong into an era of modernity and optimism. He is equally bewitched by the surreal, gigantic Atomium, which stands at the heart of this brave new world, and by Anneke, the lovely Flemish hostess who meets him off his plane. But Thomas’s new-found sense of freedom comes at a price: the Cold War is at its height, the mischievous Belgians have placed the American and Soviet pavilions right next to each other – and why is he being …

Press Play: Audible Weekly (4/11- 10/11/2013)

About a year ago I registered for an account on Audible. I remember thinking that some insta- gratification of both my book & shopping obsessions couldn’t hurt – in fact it sounded like great fun. Well, guess what? It kinda did, hurt that is… My ever-growing book and e-book “To be Read” list has been added to at quite an alarming rate these last few months (at least 3-5 audiobooks per week) – to the point where I’ve actually started wondering if I’ll ever manage to get through it all. “Press Play: Audible Weekly” will make a point of documenting audiobooks that capture my attention online & hopefully offering “upcoming read” ideas to any of you fellow book-aholics out there. It will also feature links to the full reviews, if & when mentioned titles are in fact read. So, here comes the first installment, which for no particular reason seems to be Crime- Suspense- Thriller themed: The Misletoe Bride and Other Haunting Tales by Kate Mosse From Audible: A wonderfully atmospheric collection of stories from …

On my Reading List

A selection from Waterstones’ New & Coming Soon Titles, 25 Feb 2013 Religion for Atheists: A Non-believer’s Guide to the Uses of Religion by Alain de Botton http://www.waterstones.com/waterstonesweb/products/alain+de+botton/religion+for+atheists/9378197/ Here’s the thing: According to my official papers, I’m “Christian Orthodox”. In reality I’m more of an agnostic theist (and probably an apathetic one at that). I am offended by and despise how religion (and some “all-mighty, benevolent” God) always seems to be the excuse behind the most disgraceful atrocities of human history and I will probably forever be hard pushed to pick up (and spend any serious amount of time on) most books on the subject. Despite (or because of) all that, I am intrigued by this book – which claims to  “pick and choose from the thousands of years of advice assembled by the world’s great religions to get practical insights on art, community, love, friendship, work, life and death” and propose ways in which to gracefully and spiritually  navigate our lives. Office Politics: How to Thrive in a World of Lying, Backstabbing and Dirty …

‘Bonjour Tristesse/ A Certain Smile’ by Francoise Sagan ~ A Review

Contrary to the last book I read, as part of my “Classics” experiment (Paul Auster’s “New York Trilogy”), I’m sure as hell glad I picked this one up! Francoise Sagan’s first two novels have proved short, sweet and to the point ~ making the couple of days (on/off) it took me to read them highly enjoyable and utterly worthwhile. Amongst beautiful landscapes and fascinating, highly complex characters, Sagan weaves two searing, deliciously “French” tales of love, passion, jealousy and betrayal. One simply cannot help but marvel at the maturity and writing prowess of the (18 year old) author ~ while, simultaneously, looking forward to everything else she has to offer. I have to admit to being totally enthralled by Ms. Sagan’s work, of which I, definitely, plan to read more in future (looking up “The Unmade Bed” & “That Mad Ache”, as we speak). All in all, a highly recommended read!